Elbow Pain

Elbow Pain

Elbow Injuries

Overview:

Your elbow joint is made up of bone, cartilage, ligaments and a fluid filled bursa. Muscles and tendons help the elbow joint move. When any of these structures are damaged or diseased, you can end up with elbow pain. This commonly occurs in sports (such as tennis, golf and baseball) and occupations (such as electricians and carpenters) that require repetitive elbow motion.

Anatomy:

Lateral Epicondylitis- or Tennis Elbow

Lateral Epicondylitis- or Tennis Elbow

The elbow is the joint where the three bones of the upper limb meet in the middle of the arm. The bone of the upper arm (humerus) connects with the inner bone of the forearm (ulna) and the outer bone of the forearm (radius) to form a hinge joint. The radius and ulna also meet in the elbow to allow for rotation of the forearm.

The elbows role is to allow the arm to move like a hinge as well as rotate. The biceps muscle is the major muscle that flexes the elbow with the triceps muscle being the major muscle that extends the elbow. The outer bone of the elbow is referred to as the lateral epicondyle and is a part of the humerus bone. Tendons are attached to this area which can be injured, causing inflammation or (lateral epicondylitis, or “tennis elbow”). The inner portion of the elbow is a bony prominence called the medial epicondyle. Additional tendons from the muscles attach here and can be injured, causing medial epicondylitis, “golfer’s elbow.”

Common injuries to the elbow:

Medial Epicondylitis or Golfers Elbow

Medial Epicondylitis or Golfers Elbow

  • Lateral epicondylitis (tennis elbow)
  • Medial epicondylitis (golfers elbow)
  • Olecranon bursitis
  • Elbow sprain
  • Elbow osteochondritis
  • Elbow dislocation
  • Osteoarthritis
  • Growth plate injury in children

Causes:

  • Direct or indirect trauma
  • Accumulative stress (especially with throwing sports)
  • Congenital anomalies
  • Infection


Olecranon inflammation 0r Bursitis

Olecranon inflammation 0r Bursitis

Treatment:

It is imperative that an accurate diagnosis is made before a treatment program can be formulated. A treatment program is of course tailored to an individual’s injury, age and physical condition, but should include:

  • Soft tissue massage
  • Active muscle releases
  • Mobilisation of the elbow and surrounding joints
  • Application of ice and heat
  • Light stretching protocols
  • Radial shock wave therapy
  • Kinesiotaping 

 

Kinesiology Taping for an Elbow and Arm

Kinesiology Taping for an Elbow and Arm

The practitioners at Gladesville Healthcare specialise in the treatment of elbow injuries of all types and commonly deal with all of the above condition and problems. Our success is based on a blend of evidence-based therapy, clinical experience and individual injury management.

 

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Gladesville Healthcare Clinic
74 Morrison Rd
Gladesville NSW 2111.

Clinic Hours: Monday to Friday: By Appointment
Tel: 9816. 3071
Fax: 9816 2037
Email: info@gladesvillehealthcare.com.au

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